Skip to main content

Fiber cables made of air move data at 99.7 percent the speed of light


Researchers say they have created fiber cables that can move data at 99.7 percent of the speed of light, all but eliminating the latency plaguing standard fiber technology. There are still data loss problems to be overcome before the cables could be used over long distances, but the research may be an important step toward incredibly low-latency data transmissions.
Although optic fibers transmit information using beams of light, that information doesn't actually go at "light speed." The speed of light, about 300,000 km/s, is the speed light travels in a vacuum. In a medium such as glass, it goes about 30 percent slower, a mere 200,000 km/s."[L]ight propagates 31% slower in a silica glass fibre than in vacuum, thus compromising latency," notes a paper published Sunday in Nature Photonics, titled "Towards high-capacity fibre-optic communications at the speed of light in vacuum."
The research team from the University of Southampton in England solved this problem by taking the glass out of the glass fiber. This results in a "hollow-core photonic-bandgap fibre," which is made mostly of air yet still allows light to follow the path of the cable when it twists and turns.
The methods used by the researchers result in data loss of 3.5 dB/km, an impressively low number considering its incredibly low latency. However, that data loss is still too high for long-range communications. For now, these cables won't be used to wire up Internet Service Provider networks or for transatlantic cables.The cable uses wide-bandwidth channels to send 37 streams of 40 gigabits per second each, with an aggregate transmission capacity of 1.48Tbps. Even with the current rate of data loss, the researchers say the cable technology is adequate for "short reach low-latency applications," such as future exaflop-speed supercomputers and "mega data centres.""For longer transmission distances, additional work is needed to further reduce surface scattering loss and to achieve the sub-0.2 dB km," the researchers wrote.
Although this wasn't described in the paper, one of the researchers told ExtremeTech that the cable's throughput actually goes up to 73.7Tbps, "using wave division multiplexing (WDM), combined with mode division multiplexing, to transmit three modes of 96 channels of 256Gbps."

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

LG’s first flexible OLED phone due before the year is out

LG plans to launch a flexible OLED smartphone before the end of the year, the company’s VP of mobile has confirmed, though it’s unclear to what extent the work-in-progress handset will actually flex. The OLED panel in question is the handiwork of LG Display according to VP of LG mobile Yoon Bu-hyun, the WSJ  reports, with the proposed device set to launch sometime in Q4. LG Display’s work on flexible OLEDs has been underway for some time, though the company’s efforts have perhaps been overshadowed somewhat by rival Samsung’s YOUM development. Last year, according to a Korea Times report, LG Display was preparing for

Syrian Electronic Army claims credit for CBS Twitter accounts hack

Yesterday, several of CBS ’s Twitter accounts were hacked, including its main account, and its accounts for 60 Minutes, 48 Hours, and CBS Denver. The hackers got into the account and tweeted a series of things relating to President Obama and the United States being in cahoots with Al-Qaeda . The tweets also had links that led users to malware-infested sites. While CBS was able to regain access to its accounts, it was unable to figure out who was behind the attacks, until now. The Syrian Electronic Army , the same group that hacked 3 of the BBC’s Twitter accounts, claimed

Can Technology Do a Better Job of Finding Bombs?

 With the horrifying images of the Boston Marathon bombing still much too fresh in our minds, and with citywide marathons coming up this weekend in London, Hamburg, and Salt Lake City , law enforcement officers and citizens everywhere are asking how to prevent the tragedy from being repeated. As Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs adjunct professor Abraham Wagner observed last year, on the 11th anniversary of 9/11, there’s “no magic bullet o