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Galaxy S4 graphics to be powered by new PowerVR chip

It does seem like the graphics in Samsung’s upcoming flagship—the Galaxy S4—will be powered by a PowerVR GPU. Imagination Technologies has released a press release that announces that its PowerVR SGX 544 GPU has been used in Samsung’s 5410 Octa chip that is said to power the Samsung Galaxy S4.

The GPU has two variants—the tri-core 544MP3 and the quad-core 544MP4. Reports around the Internet state that the former will be powering the Galaxy S4. More information will undoubtedly be revealed during the upcoming official announcement.
May feature the Exynos 5 Octa processor

 

Earlier this month, some leaked Antutu benchmark test results suggested that the S4 would be powered by the Exynos 5 Octa chipset which Samsung had unveiled during CES.

According to the test scores, the CPU is clocked at 1.8GHz with a 4+4 core setup. With all that power, the phone is set to top the charts. And that’s very much the case. Compared to a Nexus 4, which is powered by a Snapdragon S4 Pro processor, the benchmark results show that the Exynos 5 Octa has a crazy final tally of 24,894, which makes it nearly 40 percent faster than the Nexus.

The screenshots also reveal that the Galaxy S4 will launch with Android 4.2 Jelly Bean. The forthcoming flagship will also be a true ‘world’ phone, rather than have different variants for each region or carrier. This conclusion is arrived at thanks to the Exynos processor supporting GSM/WCDMA/LTE.

The benchmark scores also confirm that the Samsung Galaxy S4 will have a 13-megapixel primary camera, along with a 2.1-megapixel front-facing shooter. It will be released in 16GB and 32GB configurations. There is some further speculation about a 64GB version, but that might be a stretch. However, we do know that Samsung’s flagships also feature microSD card slots to further enhance the internal memory.

We can also see that the device will have a 4.99-inch, full HD screen with a resolution of 1920x1080 pixels. Seeing as there is no pixel allowance for on-screen buttons, we think there will be physical buttons just like the older Galaxy S phones. The onscreen buttons in the above screenshots are from the Nexus 4, which was used for the benchmark comparison.

The Galaxy S4 will be unveiled on March 14 in New York City. Tech2 will be bringing you all the coverage from that event, as well as word about the launch of the phone in India. For all the information we have right now, you can check out our rumour round-up for the Samsung Galaxy S4.

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