Skip to main content

WickedLeak launches quad-core Wammy Titan II for $200 (Rs 13,990)

WickedLeak has launched its new phone, the Wammy Titan II, that is set to be an upgrade to the original Titan. Along with a host of other upgrades, the Titan II will have an upgraded quad-core processor, as opposed to the original’s dual-core processor. The Wammy Titan II will come out of the box with Android 4.1 Jelly Bean and the company has stated in its press release that it will be upgradeable to Android 4.2. The smartphone is currently available for booking on WickedLeak’s website and the delivery is set to start from March 21. The phone is priced at Rs 13,990.
The WickedLeak Wammy Titan II is an upgrade over the original Titan
The WickedLeak Wammy Titan II is an upgrade over the original Titan


Here are the key features of the WickedLeak Wammy Titan II:

  • 5.3-inch IPS display with a resolution of 960 x 540 pixels
  • 3G, EDGE, Wi-Fi, Wi-Fi Hotspot
  • GPS with A-GPS
  • Bluetooth
  • 12 megapixel camera, 5 megapixel front-facing camera
  • 4GB internal memory expandable up to 32GB via microSD

The phone is equipped with MediaTek’s MTK 6589 quad-core processor clocked at 1.2GHz and the graphics will be powered by a PowerVR SGX544 GPU. To keep smartphone alive, it is equipped with a 2,300 mAh battery with a quoted working time of up to five days. Equipped with 1GB of RAM, the smartphone should be able to multitask well. With the phone essentially being an upgrade to the Wammy Titan, we asked if consumers who own the original Titan can trade their devices in to get a new one and pay the difference—the answer was a resounding "no". The process being too complicated was the reason cited. The processor upgrade possible at such a low cost is mostly possible because as per the new Union Budget, chips can be imported without any duty levied on them. Thanks to the launch of the Titan II, the price of the original Titan has been cut down to Rs 11,000. The original Titan was launched back in January and is equipped with dual-SIM slots and 1GB of RAM. It has an internal memory of 4GB and comes with Android 4.1.1 Jelly Bean out of the box. The device measures 144 x 89 x 12 mm and runs on a 2500 mAh battery that the company claims will provide up to 8 hours of talk time and 260 hours of standby time.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

LG’s first flexible OLED phone due before the year is out

LG plans to launch a flexible OLED smartphone before the end of the year, the company’s VP of mobile has confirmed, though it’s unclear to what extent the work-in-progress handset will actually flex. The OLED panel in question is the handiwork of LG Display according to VP of LG mobile Yoon Bu-hyun, the WSJ  reports, with the proposed device set to launch sometime in Q4. LG Display’s work on flexible OLEDs has been underway for some time, though the company’s efforts have perhaps been overshadowed somewhat by rival Samsung’s YOUM development. Last year, according to a Korea Times report, LG Display was preparing for

Syrian Electronic Army claims credit for CBS Twitter accounts hack

Yesterday, several of CBS ’s Twitter accounts were hacked, including its main account, and its accounts for 60 Minutes, 48 Hours, and CBS Denver. The hackers got into the account and tweeted a series of things relating to President Obama and the United States being in cahoots with Al-Qaeda . The tweets also had links that led users to malware-infested sites. While CBS was able to regain access to its accounts, it was unable to figure out who was behind the attacks, until now. The Syrian Electronic Army , the same group that hacked 3 of the BBC’s Twitter accounts, claimed

Can Technology Do a Better Job of Finding Bombs?

 With the horrifying images of the Boston Marathon bombing still much too fresh in our minds, and with citywide marathons coming up this weekend in London, Hamburg, and Salt Lake City , law enforcement officers and citizens everywhere are asking how to prevent the tragedy from being repeated. As Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs adjunct professor Abraham Wagner observed last year, on the 11th anniversary of 9/11, there’s “no magic bullet o