Skip to main content



Facebook testing Twitter-like 'Post from any page' button


The button will be displayed on every pageFacebook has some more design tweaks up its sleeve. Although minor in comparison to the new Timeline and News Feed, Facebook seems to be on its way to introduce a universal Status Update button to the top bar a la Twitter.  
The new “Post on Your Timeline” button is a tiny pencil shaped one situated next to the user’s name on the upper right of Facebook’s top bar. This test was first spotted by Mashable. It is interesting to note that the post button was found on a profile that had not been granted access to Graph Search yet. 

The button appears on any page you navigate to, making it easy for users to add an image or update their status without having to head back to the Home or Timeline page. The button is reminiscent of Twitter’s tweet button, something the micro-blogging site has proudly sported for a long time now.

The new “Post on Your Timeline” button is a tiny pencil shaped one situated next to the user’s name on the upper right of Facebook’s top bar. This test was first spotted by Mashable. It is interesting to note that the post button was found on a profile that had not been granted access to Graph Search yet. 

The button appears on any page you navigate to, making it easy for users to add an image or update their status without having to head back to the Home or Timeline page. The button is reminiscent of Twitter’s tweet button, something the micro-blogging site has proudly sported for a long time now.

The button will be displayed on every page


Clicking on the button will open up a box that will ask you “What’s on your mind?” and you can simply post a status update or add photos just like you can from your homepage. Even if you’re on a friend’s profile or a fan page, or maybe even while you’re using an app, you will now be able to update your status. 

Facebook told The Next Web that this indeed was a “small test” but declined to elaborate any further. Considering that this feature had been spotted on a non-Graph Search enabled profile, it does look like Facebook could be trying out this feature with those left behind for now. While the icon has been placed bang next to the profile button, there is just no place to put the icon there if you have Graph Search. It looks like a cramped new header will be in store for those of you who have Graph Search, if the new button is added. 

This, of course, will not be the first time Facebook has borrowed from Twitter. The social networking giant is said to be borrowing the hashtag feature from the micro-blogging website. 

According to a Wall Street Journal report, Facebook is all set to channel the hashtag feature in order to bunch conversations together by converting the tag into a link. Sources said that it wasn’t clear how far Facebook’s work on the hashtag had gotten and the feature isn’t likely to be introduced any time soon. 

While Twitter does not own the hashtag, it is the micro-blogging site that made the symbol known worldwide. Many other social networking websites, including Facebook-owned Instagram and Google+ use the feature prominently on their websites. The link created by the hashtags lead users to a whole new page where posts related to the topic are updated in real-time.
A box will prompt you to update your status
A box will prompt you to update your status


Not too long ago, Facebook introduced the ability to tag users in posts, status updates and comments using the “@” option, also a typical Twitter feature. Facebook also tweaked the “subscribe” option to call it “follow”, renaming subscribers as followers just like Twitter.

Facebook also released a reworked, more simplified News Feed for users last month. The company apparently studied how Facebook is used on different platforms and designed the apps with that in mind. Facebook said PC users tend to spend a lot more time going through their feeds than smartphone users, so the mobile app is a lot more condensed and now shows you more information on a smaller screen. The PC experience, on the other hand, is sparse and more spaced out. It allows greater play for every update and bigger pictures help them stand out.

Facebook also unveiled a new Timeline that users have already started getting. On it, all posts are on the right side, with photos, music and other recent activities on the left. Not easily satiated, it looks like Facebook is going to make further tweaks to the site soon. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

LG’s first flexible OLED phone due before the year is out

LG plans to launch a flexible OLED smartphone before the end of the year, the company’s VP of mobile has confirmed, though it’s unclear to what extent the work-in-progress handset will actually flex. The OLED panel in question is the handiwork of LG Display according to VP of LG mobile Yoon Bu-hyun, the WSJ  reports, with the proposed device set to launch sometime in Q4. LG Display’s work on flexible OLEDs has been underway for some time, though the company’s efforts have perhaps been overshadowed somewhat by rival Samsung’s YOUM development. Last year, according to a Korea Times report, LG Display was preparing for

Syrian Electronic Army claims credit for CBS Twitter accounts hack

Yesterday, several of CBS ’s Twitter accounts were hacked, including its main account, and its accounts for 60 Minutes, 48 Hours, and CBS Denver. The hackers got into the account and tweeted a series of things relating to President Obama and the United States being in cahoots with Al-Qaeda . The tweets also had links that led users to malware-infested sites. While CBS was able to regain access to its accounts, it was unable to figure out who was behind the attacks, until now. The Syrian Electronic Army , the same group that hacked 3 of the BBC’s Twitter accounts, claimed

Can Technology Do a Better Job of Finding Bombs?

 With the horrifying images of the Boston Marathon bombing still much too fresh in our minds, and with citywide marathons coming up this weekend in London, Hamburg, and Salt Lake City , law enforcement officers and citizens everywhere are asking how to prevent the tragedy from being repeated. As Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs adjunct professor Abraham Wagner observed last year, on the 11th anniversary of 9/11, there’s “no magic bullet o