Skip to main content

Man sent to jail for watching 'pixie sex'

In Japan, the viewing of hentai, or sexually explicit cartoons, is a mainstream activity. But it's far from accepted in many other countries. In fact, now a New Zealand man has been sentenced to three months in jail for watching cartoons of "elves, pixies, and other fantasy creatures" have sex. 
The man's lawyer said the Japanese anime cartoons consisted of creatures that "you knew at a glance weren't human," and said his client's conviction for possessing digitally created pornography represents "the law gone mad."

The characters were "clearly young elves and pixies, which led to concerns the images were linked to child sexual abuse," reported Fairfax NZ News. New Zealand anti-child pornography activists defended the conviction, saying the images could encourage people "to migrate from there to the real thing."
In the US, the legality of "virtual child pornography" which involves created images of children has been debated in courts. Regular child pornography isn't protected by free-speech rules, because the production of the images is itself harmful to children. Distribution and viewing of such images is also illegal, as that activity contributes to the market for a product that harms children.
However, the legality of "virtual" child porn was upheld in a 2002 US Supreme Court ruling, Ashcroft v. Free Speech Coalition. In response to that ruling, Congress passed a 2003 law called the PROTECT Act, with more specific language about what kind of computer images are banned. If a computer-generated image is "indistinguishable from" child pornography, then it can be prosecuted even if no actual child was involved. 
Thus, making "fake" child porn is a really bad idea and can land you in jail. In the US, people have been prosecuted for viewing animated pictures of children having sex.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

LG’s first flexible OLED phone due before the year is out

LG plans to launch a flexible OLED smartphone before the end of the year, the company’s VP of mobile has confirmed, though it’s unclear to what extent the work-in-progress handset will actually flex. The OLED panel in question is the handiwork of LG Display according to VP of LG mobile Yoon Bu-hyun, the WSJ  reports, with the proposed device set to launch sometime in Q4. LG Display’s work on flexible OLEDs has been underway for some time, though the company’s efforts have perhaps been overshadowed somewhat by rival Samsung’s YOUM development. Last year, according to a Korea Times report, LG Display was preparing for

Syrian Electronic Army claims credit for CBS Twitter accounts hack

Yesterday, several of CBS ’s Twitter accounts were hacked, including its main account, and its accounts for 60 Minutes, 48 Hours, and CBS Denver. The hackers got into the account and tweeted a series of things relating to President Obama and the United States being in cahoots with Al-Qaeda . The tweets also had links that led users to malware-infested sites. While CBS was able to regain access to its accounts, it was unable to figure out who was behind the attacks, until now. The Syrian Electronic Army , the same group that hacked 3 of the BBC’s Twitter accounts, claimed

Can Technology Do a Better Job of Finding Bombs?

 With the horrifying images of the Boston Marathon bombing still much too fresh in our minds, and with citywide marathons coming up this weekend in London, Hamburg, and Salt Lake City , law enforcement officers and citizens everywhere are asking how to prevent the tragedy from being repeated. As Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs adjunct professor Abraham Wagner observed last year, on the 11th anniversary of 9/11, there’s “no magic bullet o