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PayPal transfers U.S. $ 92 quadrillion in user account by accident


money-632x474 (1)This huge amount has been accidentally, for a brief moment, the PayPal account of Chris Reynolds, a man 56 years old from Pennsylvania, using the payment service online to buy and sell car parts and other items. Reynolds realized that he had been temporarily "quatrilionário" when received a monthly statement from PayPal, saying that the balance of your account that month was-take a deep breath:

U.S. $ 92,233,720,368,547,800. (Ninety-two quadrillion, two hundred thirty-three trillion, seven hundred and twenty billion, three hundred sixty-eight million, five hundred forty-seven thousand eight hundred U.S. dollars.)But when Reynolds-who usually spend $ 100 a month on-site accessed your account, the error was corrected. "I would pay the national debt [U.S.] first. Then buy the Phillies [Major League Baseball team located in Philadelphia], if I could get a good price, "he told the United Press International .

PayPal would not comment on the case because it goes against their privacy policy to speak of specific user accounts.

To give you an idea, the amount is 1,300 times greater than the GDP of all countries of the world and is trillions of times greater than the total amount of money owned by Carlos Slim, to an amount of U.S. $ 73 billion, is the man richest on the planet.

With U.S. $ 92 quadrillion what would buy?
• 46 million Antilia the most expensive house in the world, which has 27 floors -6 reserved only for cars and is located in Mumbai, India, its construction was estimated at $ 2 billion.
• Or more than 3 billion Mercedes Benz W196, used by Argentine Fangio to secure his second world title in Formula 1 in 1954, and rated as the most expensive car in history after being recently sold at auction for $ 29.6 million ;
• Buy thousands of square meters in Vila Nova Conceição, local m² most expensive city of São Paulo .
• Car lovers, would buy 1700 models of the Bugatti Veyron Supersport, the most expensive car in the world. And for the dreamers and lovers of football, buy Real Madrid, Manchester United, Barcelona and create the team of the stars of world football.
If you are not so materialistic as well, also gives to donate to numerous charities and centers for disease research, the options are (almost) endless.
Source: NZN
So the question remains: What would you do with $ 92,000,000,000,000,000?

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