Skip to main content

Sensoria’s Smart Fitness Socks Track Your Steps And Coach Your Running Style

I’ve changed running styles a bunch of times over the years, shifting from mindless heelstriking to a quasi-shuffle of my own invention to try to lower the impact of running on concrete, to (finally) proper forefooting after getting gait analysis done at a running gear shop.  I can’t praise forefooting enough. It is harder work for the ankles, and initially tougher on the calves too,
but once you get the technique down it’s infinitely superior to pounding pavement with your heels. And much faster than a too-conservative shuffle. Locking a new running technique can be tough though, so enter the Sensoria Smart Sock Fitness Tracker — which wants to track your steps and advise on running style, by doing real-time gait analysis thanks to its sensor-stuffed socks.
Sensoria’s wearable device consists of a pair of socks, containing its “e-textile technology” (which basically boils down to pressure sensors, so it can figure out which bits of your foot are taking the weight as you run), plus a clip-on Bluetooth 4.0 device that also contains an accelerometer and altimeter, and attaches to the ankle of the sock via magnets (it’s detachable so the sock can be washed). This wirelessly connects to your computer or smartphone to upload your running data.
As well as tracking basics like steps and speed, the device is designed specifically for runners so it also tracks a range of more specialist metrics including which part of your foot you’re landing on so you can perfect your foot-strike technique; your overall cadence metronome by measuring stride frequency to help you stay in an optimal running rhythm; and it also has a stride analyser to monitor average stride length to ensure good form, much as a running coach might.
The system can also track inactivity, since it is a step tracker it knows when your foot has been stationary for a while so can figure out you’re sitting down and send you an alert to take a screen break. Which sounds like a very handy feature for the average blogger.
Sensoria’s system supports both real-time coaching, if you use its app (which will be available for iOS 6 and above and Android 4.3 and above — this limited reach is down to the need for the platform to have Bluetooth 4.0 support) while out running — which can give prompts and warnings for things like heelstriking — or retrospectively analysis of your performance via its software dashboard:
sensoria smart socks
Sensoria’s creators are currently seeking crowdsourced funding via Indiegogo to get their idea to market — and are very close to their target of $87,000, with 16 days left to run on the campaign. Currently all the lowest priced pledges that include the full device ($99) have been bagged but there are still multiple pledges at the $119 price-point. For that you get the fitness tracker and one pair of socks. Three pairs of extra socks are also available for $59.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

LG’s first flexible OLED phone due before the year is out

LG plans to launch a flexible OLED smartphone before the end of the year, the company’s VP of mobile has confirmed, though it’s unclear to what extent the work-in-progress handset will actually flex. The OLED panel in question is the handiwork of LG Display according to VP of LG mobile Yoon Bu-hyun, the WSJ  reports, with the proposed device set to launch sometime in Q4. LG Display’s work on flexible OLEDs has been underway for some time, though the company’s efforts have perhaps been overshadowed somewhat by rival Samsung’s YOUM development. Last year, according to a Korea Times report, LG Display was preparing for

Syrian Electronic Army claims credit for CBS Twitter accounts hack

Yesterday, several of CBS ’s Twitter accounts were hacked, including its main account, and its accounts for 60 Minutes, 48 Hours, and CBS Denver. The hackers got into the account and tweeted a series of things relating to President Obama and the United States being in cahoots with Al-Qaeda . The tweets also had links that led users to malware-infested sites. While CBS was able to regain access to its accounts, it was unable to figure out who was behind the attacks, until now. The Syrian Electronic Army , the same group that hacked 3 of the BBC’s Twitter accounts, claimed

Can Technology Do a Better Job of Finding Bombs?

 With the horrifying images of the Boston Marathon bombing still much too fresh in our minds, and with citywide marathons coming up this weekend in London, Hamburg, and Salt Lake City , law enforcement officers and citizens everywhere are asking how to prevent the tragedy from being repeated. As Columbia University School of International and Public Affairs adjunct professor Abraham Wagner observed last year, on the 11th anniversary of 9/11, there’s “no magic bullet o