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Thin Ice: A Shoe Insole That will burn Your 1000 Calories a Day

Thin Ice weight-loss technology is integrated seamlessly into the clothing you where where helps produce weight-loss throughout the day. It does this by stimulating strategic parts of your body with cold temperatures. But don’t worry, this stimulation is so mild you won’t even notice after a few seconds of adapting. Think about a time when you’ve jumped into a pool and gotten a jolt of cold that almost instantly disappears. The same process is at play here.
Your body detects these temperature changes with thermoreceptors which trick your body into thinking you’re are in a cold environment. Your body responds by creating heat in the core an sending warm blood around the body to cool down the chilled areas.

The fuel for this laborious process is nearly pure body fat. So, by forcing your body to respond to cold-temperature stimulation throughout the day it, you’ll be able to burn fat without even thinking about it!

How Does Thin Ice Clothing Harness the Metabolism Hack? 

The Thin Ice insole and vest target regions of your body with high concentrations of thermometers. These neural receptors alert your body to the presence of cold, triggering a metabolic response that generates heat in your core.
As the core’s blood warms, it then must be pumped all the way to the extremities. The best part of this process is that your body does all this calorie-expensive work automatically without you even having to think about it. 

What’s the Science Behind Thin Ice!?

The bodily pathway responsible for this heat generation is called the Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT) pathway. This pathway basically functions as your body’s internal thermostat. Even in room temperature, roughly 50% of your daily calories are burnt for no other reason than to keep your body at a comfortable temperature.
Notice that you undergo NO shivering at room temperature. This is because the BAT pathway is completely different than the shivering mechanism. Thin Ice stimulates BAT and will not make you shiver. This allows Thin Ice’s patent-pending weight-loss technology to help you burn excess calories while being hidden discretely in clothing and apparel items.

Show Me the Research!

Thin Ice products might sound too good to be true, but we are proud to say that their underlying concept is based on decades of rigorous peer-reviewed scientific research.

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