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US airports are Scanning your Face by Facial recognition scanners.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has been working with airlines to implement biometric face scanners in domestic airports to better streamline security. In fact, they're already in place in certain airports around the country.  But how does the process work? Which airlines and airports are involved right now?

Here's everything you need to know about the latest technological advances in airport screenings, from the government's work. Biometric airport screening is a fancy way of saying that the government is using facial recognition technology at the airport. Government agencies (in conjunction with airlines) are aiming to improve efficiency when it comes the way travelers enter and exit the U.S.
This is separate from the eye and fingertip scanning done by CLEAR, a secure identity company available at more than 60 airports, stadiums and other venues around the country.
Here's how the process of facial scanning at the airports works: Cameras take your photo, and then the CBP's Traveler Verification Service matches it to a photo the Department of Homeland Security has of you already. These could be images from sources like your passport or other travel documents.
 Should you need to be concerned about privacy?  Let us know in comments

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