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Showing posts from August 18, 2019

Woman Finds Diamond While Learning How To Find Diamonds

A Texas woman found a 3.26 Caret diamond   right where she was sitting and watching  a YouTube video on how to find diamonds. Miranda Hollingshead, 27, was visiting the Crater of Diamonds State Park in Arkansas in a family outing. They'd been at the park for about an hour, when she decided to take a break at the base of a hill. She fired up the YouTube video and started watching. The park allows its visitors to search for diamonds in a designated 37.5-acre area. For a second, she glanced over to check on her child before returning to the video. That's when she saw it: a yellow diamond, sticking out among the other rocks. "I shook my hand across it to make sure what it was, picked it up, and yelled across the field to my mom, 'I think I got one!'" she told park officials. She was right.

Intel Shows Off First Artificial Intelligence Chip: Spring Hill

Intel launched an artificial intelligence processor called Nervana NNP-I or ‘Spring Hill’. According to reports, this processor has been designed for large computing centers. Intel Nervana NNP-I is based on a 10 nanometer Ice Lake processor and is purpose-built specifically to accelerate deep learning deployment at scale, offering excellent performance for major data center workloads. Intel also said that this processor also offers a high degree of programmability without compromising performance to power efficiency. Dedicated accelerators like the Intel Nervana NNPs are built from the ground up, with a focus on AI to provide customers the right intelligence at the right time,” says Intel in an official blog post. These chips have been birthed at the company’s development facility in Haifa, Israel after Intel’s investment in AI startups such as Habana Labs and NeuroBlade.

Tesla's solar panels catch fire at Walmart stores, Sued

Walmart has sued Tesla after rooftop solar panels on Their multiple retailer's stores caught fire, allegedly due to poor safety practices. Tesla supposedly didn't ground its electrical and solar systems properly, according to Walmart, and regularly sent inspectors who "lacked basic solar training and knowledge." Walmart also asserted that Tesla's panels were rife with visible defects. Wallmart accused Tesla of breach of contract, gross negligence, and failure to meet industry standards. It wanted Tesla to not only pay damages related to the first but to remove its panels from over 240 Walmart stores. There's a good possibility Tesla will fight back, though. The company has been struggling to revive its solar business, which installed a modest 29MW of solar power capacity in the second quarter compared to more than 200MW at the division's peak. The last thing it needs is to lose a major deployment and suffer the negative publicity that comes with that

US airports are Scanning your Face by Facial recognition scanners.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has been working with airlines to implement biometric face scanners in domestic airports to better streamline security. In fact, they're already in place in certain airports around the country.  But how does the process work? Which airlines and airports are involved right now? Here's everything you need to know about the latest technological advances in airport screenings, from the government's work. Biometric airport screening is a fancy way of saying that the government is using facial recognition technology at the airport. Government agencies (in conjunction with airlines) are aiming to improve efficiency when it comes the way travelers enter and exit the U.S. This is separate from the eye and fingertip scanning done by CLEAR, a secure identity company available at more than 60 airports, stadiums and other venues around the country. Here's how the process of facial scanning at the airports works: Cameras take your photo,

Microsoft Chromium-Based Browser Released

Microsoft announced the third and final preview build of its Chromium-based Edge browser. Giving key insights into its development process, features expected in the stable build, as well as details on the beta program, Joe Belfiore, corporate vice president of Windows, wrote on the official Microsoft blog that the Edge browser betas for both Windows and Apple's macOS are now live. According to Belfiore's post, "the next version of Microsoft Edge is ready for everyday use". The key reason behind this is because fundamentally, the beta build is far more stable, secure and free of bugs in comparison to its alpha release in both Canary and Dev circles. In fact, to make security matters more assured for users, .Major updates to the Edge beta will be introduced every six weeks, while any security irregularities will see patch releases as per urgency.